They Called Us Enemy

They Called Us Enemy Review

A stunning graphic memoir recounting actor/author/activist George Takei's childhood imprisoned within American concentration camps during World War II. Experience the forces that shaped an American icon -- and America itself -- in this gripping tale of courage, country, loyalty, and love.

George Takei has captured hearts and minds worldwide with his captivating stage presence and outspoken commitment to equal rights. But long before he braved new frontiers in Star Trek, he woke up as a four-year-old boy to find his own birth country at war with his father's -- and their entire family forced from their home into an uncertain future.

In 1942, at the order of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, every person of Japanese descent on the west coast was rounded up and shipped to one of ten "relocation centers," hundreds or thousands of miles from home, where they would be held for years under armed guard.

They Called Us Enemy is Takei's firsthand account of those years behind barbed wire, the joys and terrors of growing up under legalized racism, his mother's hard choices, his father's faith in democracy, and the way those experiences planted the seeds for his astonishing future.

What is American? Who gets to decide? When the world is against you, what can one person do? To answer these questions, George Takei joins co-writers Justin Eisinger & Steven Scott and artist Harmony Becker for the journey of a lifetime.

Title:They Called Us Enemy
Edition Language:English

    They Called Us Enemy Reviews

  • David Schaafsma

    George Takei played a relatively minor character, Sulu, in the first iteration of Star Trek which ended far too soon. Years later, many people got to watch this show in endless reruns, and he, with th...

  • Steve

    Well done, George Takei (and, of course, kudos to the co-authors and artists), and thank you for using your (frankly, enormous) reputation (OK, let's put it out there, from Star Trek) to advance the c...

  • Sheila Beaumont

    George Takei's compelling, heartfelt graphic memoir about his family's experiences during the U.S. government's incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II is a must-read.After the bombing...

  • David

    This was a heartfelt, passionate and painful story that I couldn't put down. I have always known about the internment camps of World War II and the mistreatment of so many loyal citizens by the U.S. g...

  • Paul  Hankins

    There are moments in a reader/teacher's experience when you can see a book getting ready to release and he, she, or they have already begun to pull the "ladder" texts (READING LADDERS by Dr. Teri Lese...

  • Jeanne

    Justice grows out of recognition of ourselves in each other. That my liberty depends on you being free, too. That history can't be a sword to justify injustice, or a shield against progress but must b...

  • Stewart Tame

    As a public figure, George Takei needs no introduction. Actor, author, activist … at the very least, he is known for his role as Sulu in the Star Trek series. But during his childhood, his family wa...

  • Katrina

    Thoughtfully and artfully told, George Takei now shares his story in graphic novel format. It’s unfortunate to call this “timely,” but that’s what it is. As the US is unjustly imprisoning asyl...

  • Robert Greenberger

    I'll stipulate upfront I have known George Takei since the 1970s and consider him a friend. In all the time we have spent together, this never came up, despite meeting his mother along the way. Over t...

  • Laura

    OK, I'm sure we are tired of hearing that history repeats and repeats itself, but as I read this memoir of George Takei, of his time in the Internment camps that was established by executive order, at...